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Easily find & kill MongoDB operations from MongoLab’s UI

A few months ago, we wrote a blog post on finding and terminating long-running operations in MongoDB. To help make it even easier for MongoLab users* to quickly identify the cause behind database unresponsiveness, we’ve integrated the currentOp() and killOp() methods into our management portal. Continue Reading →

Tutorial: Scaling Meteor with MongoDB oplog tailing

Ever since Meteor 0.7.0 first introduced oplog tailing, we’ve had a lot of users asking us about using the MongoDB oplog with their Meteor applications. As a result, we thought a step-by-step tutorial would help folks get started.

Continue Reading →

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Reporting back from MongoDB World 2014, NYC, Planet JSON

Closely approaching the one year mark of when I first joined MongoLab (and the MongoDB community), I had the pleasure of attending the inaugural MongoDB World conference put together by the incredible MongoDB team. Second only to the excitement around major MongoDB feature announcements was the collective disbelief that this was MongoDB’s first multi-day conference ever.  A big congratulations to all those that worked hard to put on such a massive (did you see the Intrepid!?) event. All this planning would have been for naught if MongoDB leaders and engineers failed to deliver announcements and features that would meet and exceed expectations. From major public cloud announcements to the reveal of document-level locking in version 2.8, developers and conference goers had plenty to be excited about. There was a lot to digest from the conference… we’ll cover the major highlights in case you missed them. Continue Reading →

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MongoDB driver tips & tricks: PHP

A large proportion of support requests to MongoLab are questions about how to properly configure and use a particular MongoDB driver.

This blog post is the third of a series where we are covering each of the major MongoDB drivers in depth. The driver we’ll be covering here is the PHP driver, developed and maintained by the MongoDB, Inc. team (primarily @derickr, @bjori and @jmikola). Continue Reading →

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MongoDB driver tips & tricks: Mongoose

Many of the support requests we get at MongoLab are questions about how to properly configure and use particular MongoDB drivers and client libraries.

This blog post is the 2nd of a series where we are covering the popular MongoDB drivers in depth (we covered Mongoid last time). The driver we’re covering today is Mongoose, which is maintained by Aaron Heckmann (@aaronheckmann) and officially supported by MongoDB, Inc. Continue Reading →

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MongoDB driver tips & tricks: Mongoid 3

Update 8/18/2014: Added section about refresh_interval, removed Mongoid 4 references

Many of the support requests we get at MongoLab are questions about how to properly configure and use particular MongoDB drivers.

This blog post is the first of a series where we plan to cover each of the major MongoDB drivers in depth. The driver we’ll be covering today is Mongoid, developed by Durran Jordan (@modetojoy). Continue Reading →

{ "comments": 3 }

Finding and terminating long-running operations in MongoDB

When your MongoDB becomes unresponsive, it’s imperative that you can quickly identify the cause.

Although there can be many reasons for unresponsiveness, we sometimes find that particularly long-running and/or blocking operations (either initiated by a human or an application) are the culprit. Some examples of common operations that can bog down the database are:

  • operations on unindexed fields

  • index builds

  • expensive map-reduce jobs

One way to quickly see if one or more operations are particularly long-running is to use db.currentOp().

Continue Reading →

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Managing disk space in MongoDB

In our previous post on MongoDB storage structure and dbStats metrics, we covered how MongoDB stores data and the differences between the dataSize, storageSize and fileSize metrics. We can now apply this knowledge to evaluate strategies for re-using MongoDB disk space.

When documents or collections are deleted, empty record blocks within data files arise. MongoDB attempts to reuse this space when possible, but it will never return this space to the file system. This behavior explains why fileSize never decreases despite deletes on a database.

If your app frequently deletes or if your fileSize is significantly larger than the size of your data plus indexes, you can use one of the methods below reclaim free space. Continue Reading →

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