A Primer on Geospatial Data and MongoDB

MongoDB offers new geospatial features in versions 2.4 and 2.6.  The core of these features is the introduction of GeoJSON, an open-source format for rich geospatial types that go beyond what MongoDB has supported in previous versions.

This post is a primer for developers new to geospatial data in MongoDB. We aim to familiarize you with geospatial fundamentals in MongoDB and help you get the most out of your data.

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Easily find & kill MongoDB operations from MongoLab’s UI

A few months ago, we wrote a blog post on finding and terminating long-running operations in MongoDB. To help make it even easier for MongoLab users* to quickly identify the cause behind database unresponsiveness, we’ve integrated the currentOp() and killOp() methods into our management portal. Continue Reading →

MongoLab’s next-generation Dedicated AWS plans – 100% SSD!

We’re excited to announce the next generation of MongoLab’s production-ready Dedicated plans on Amazon Web Services (AWS). After years of experience managing a fleet of over a hundred thousand MongoDB databases ranging from tiny to terabytes, we’ve seen a large number of use cases. We know that when it comes to databases, one size doesn’t fit all.

That’s why our new 100% SSD-backed Dedicated plans on AWS offer a much larger variety than our previous generation. We have analyzed thousands of existing deployments and created packages that allow users to choose what is important for their particular use case. These new plans give users the power to optimize for cost efficiency, storage, or performance. Continue Reading →

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Tutorial: Scaling Meteor with MongoDB oplog tailing

Ever since Meteor 0.7.0 first introduced oplog tailing, we’ve had a lot of users asking us about using the MongoDB oplog with their Meteor applications. As a result, we thought a step-by-step tutorial would help folks get started.

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Reporting back from MongoDB World 2014, NYC, Planet JSON

Closely approaching the one year mark of when I first joined MongoLab (and the MongoDB community), I had the pleasure of attending the inaugural MongoDB World conference put together by the incredible MongoDB team. Second only to the excitement around major MongoDB feature announcements was the collective disbelief that this was MongoDB’s first multi-day conference ever.  A big congratulations to all those that worked hard to put on such a massive (did you see the Intrepid!?) event. All this planning would have been for naught if MongoDB leaders and engineers failed to deliver announcements and features that would meet and exceed expectations. From major public cloud announcements to the reveal of document-level locking in version 2.8, developers and conference goers had plenty to be excited about. There was a lot to digest from the conference… we’ll cover the major highlights in case you missed them. Continue Reading →

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Production-ready MongoDB Replica Sets on Google Cloud Platform

Great news, Google Cloud users!

Today Google, MongoDB Inc., and MongoLab are announcing the arrival of fully-managed, production-ready MongoDB replica set plans on the Google Cloud Platform (GCP). These plans are hosted on Google Compute Engine (GCE) and managed by MongoLab. You can get started for free!

By leveraging MongoLab’s MongoDB-as-a-Service platform on GCP, Google developers running MongoDB can focus on product development and not get bogged down by database administration and operations. Automated provisioning, multi-zone data replication, backups and monitoring are all provided by the platform, so developers only need to worry about is their schema and their code (ok, we can help you a little with that too). Continue Reading →

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Using Fluentd and MongoDB serverStatus for real-time metrics

As developers, we often look for tools to make our work and processes more efficient. Sometimes we have to search for what we’re looking for and sometimes we’re lucky enough that it finds us! When our friends over at Treasure Data wrote to me about Fluentd, an open-source logging daemon written in Ruby that they created and maintain, I immediately saw value for MongoDB users looking for a quick way to collect data streams and store information in MongoDB.

Intro to Fluentd

Fluentd is an open source data collector designed to simplify and scale log management. Open-sourced in October 2011, it has gained traction steadily over the last 2.5 years: today, Fluentd has a thriving community of ~50 contributors and 1,900+ stargazers on GitHub with companies like Slideshare and Nintendo deploying it across hundreds of machines in production.

Fluentd has broad use cases: Slideshare integrates it into their company-wide infrastructure monitoring system, and Change.org uses it to route their log streams into various backends.

Most relevant to MongoDB developers, many folks use Fluentd to aggregate logs into MongoDB. The MongoDB community was one of the first to take notice of Fluentd, and the MongoDB plugin is one of the most downloaded Fluentd plugins to date. Continue Reading →

MongoDB driver tips & tricks: PHP

A large proportion of support requests to MongoLab are questions about how to properly configure and use a particular MongoDB driver.

This blog post is the third of a series where we are covering each of the major MongoDB drivers in depth. The driver we’ll be covering here is the PHP driver, developed and maintained by the MongoDB, Inc. team (primarily @derickr, @bjori and @jmikola). Continue Reading →

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