Respondly explains why devs love Meteor and MongoDB

With the recent release of Meteor 1.0 (and the huge buzz around it), developers may be wondering why the Meteor framework is so popular. Or perhaps, for developers new to web programming, what is Meteor?

To help you better understand Meteor from a developer’s perspective, we’ve asked Tim Haines, founder of team email and twitter inbox service Respondly, to share his experience working with both Meteor and MongoDB.

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Run SQL Queries on MongoLab

This is a guest post by John A. De Goes, CTO of SlamData. SlamData is the commercial company behind the open source project of the same name. John is the original author and an active contributor to the SlamData project.

SlamData is a relatively new open source project that lets you write and execute SQL queries against a MongoDB instance. We just launched 1.0 of the product, after many engineering years of effort.

In this post, I’ll talk a little bit about what SlamData is useful for, and how you can begin using SlamData with your MongoLab account. Continue Reading →

Fully-managed MongoDB replica sets for $15

We’re very excited to announce $15 Shared Cluster plans across all major cloud providers (AWS, AzureGoogle, et al.) on MongoLab! MongoDB replica set clusters offer many benefits to developers, the biggest being high-availability. Any application in production needs a highly-available database to minimize downtime. At $15/GB per month, weekend hackers and teams on a tight budget can now afford to rest easy knowing that their application is backed by a highly-available MongoLab database. Continue Reading →

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Custom firewalls for your MongoDB deployment(s)

MongoLab runs all of its hosted MongoDB deployments with authorization enabled, which means that username / password authentication is required before your database can be accessed.

For lower-level network security we also allow you to configure custom firewall settings. This feature is available to all MongoLab users on Dedicated plans.

Configuring custom firewalls

If you have yet to configure a custom firewall, you’ll notice a new Firewall tab from your deployment view. By default, your firewall configuration will include 0.0.0.0/0, which allows all traffic to your database.

MongoLab MongoDB GUI Firewall feature

To lock down your deployment, we allow three options for configuring new firewall rules. You may:

  • Whitelist IP addresses
  • Whitelist Amazon EC2 Security Groups
  • Copy existing rules from one deployment to another

Whitelisting IP addresses

MongoLab can configure your firewall to limit access to only the IP address(es) (or address ranges) you specify. We use CIDR rules to define the allowable address(es) and secure access to your MongoLab-hosted Dedicated plan databases.

Whitelisting Amazon EC2 security groups (AWS only)

If your Dedicated plan database is hosted on AWS and your application is running from the same AWS region and on EC2-Classic, we recommend allowing access to Security Group(s) instead of IP addresses. This way you won’t need to change your database deployment’s firewall rules as you spin up/down your app servers.

To control access to your MongoLab-hosted database using your EC2 security group, you’ll need to provide your AWS account ID (a 12-digit number) and the name or ID of your Security Group(s).

Copy existing rules

If you have already configured custom allow rules for one MongoDB deployment in your MongoLab account, you can copy these rules to any other Dedicated plan deployment in your account. Simply select which deployment you want to copy from, and we’ll take care of the rest!

Security is our priority

MongoLab takes the security of MongoLab accounts and deployments seriously. We are continuously working to improve the features and tools that increase the safety of your data. To find up-to-date information on what security features are available to MongoLab users, visit our documentation portal. As always, if you have any questions or feedback you can reach us at support@mongolab.com.

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A Primer on Geospatial Data and MongoDB

MongoDB offers new geospatial features in versions 2.4 and 2.6.  The core of these features is the introduction of GeoJSON, an open-source format for rich geospatial types that go beyond what MongoDB has supported in previous versions.

This post is a primer for developers new to geospatial data in MongoDB. We aim to familiarize you with geospatial fundamentals in MongoDB and help you get the most out of your data.

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Easily find & kill MongoDB operations from MongoLab’s UI

A few months ago, we wrote a blog post on finding and terminating long-running operations in MongoDB. To help make it even easier for MongoLab users* to quickly identify the cause behind database unresponsiveness, we’ve integrated the currentOp() and killOp() methods into our management portal. Continue Reading →

MongoLab’s next-generation Dedicated AWS plans – 100% SSD!

We’re excited to announce the next generation of MongoLab’s production-ready Dedicated plans on Amazon Web Services (AWS). After years of experience managing a fleet of over a hundred thousand MongoDB databases ranging from tiny to terabytes, we’ve seen a large number of use cases. We know that when it comes to databases, one size doesn’t fit all.

That’s why our new 100% SSD-backed Dedicated plans on AWS offer a much larger variety than our previous generation. We have analyzed thousands of existing deployments and created packages that allow users to choose what is important for their particular use case. These new plans give users the power to optimize for cost efficiency, storage, or performance. Continue Reading →

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Tutorial: Scaling Meteor with MongoDB oplog tailing

Updated September 12, 2014: Added section on compatibility with 2.6

Ever since Meteor 0.7.0 first introduced oplog tailing, we’ve had a lot of users asking us about using the MongoDB oplog with their Meteor applications. As a result, we thought a step-by-step tutorial would help folks get started.

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